Betty


October 1st, 2014 by

I am sure you have all heard of the KISS principle. Keeping things simple is more effective. This certainly applies to technology and storytelling in interpretive exhibit design. A couple weeks ago, I visited King John’s Castle in Limerick, Ireland. They recently installed six million Euro of new exhibitry in this 13th Century Castle. This new visitor experience is the cornerstone and start of Limerick’s development plan to become Ireland’s first City of Culture. (more…)

Renee


September 29th, 2014 by

Ways to control exhibit costsExhibits cost money. No surprise there. Sometimes, they cost lots of money and since most people don’t purchase new exhibits every day or even every decade, sticker shock can set in.

Lots of factors influence what exhibit costs.

For a design/build project, clients can expect to pay a design fee and, of course, the cost of the time and materials required to build, ship, install, and manage an exhibit project. Those are the very most basic ingredients that make up a project budget, and, of course, there are lots of nuances that drive those costs. Things like how much travel is required and even the number of miles between the client and design firm can make a difference. (more…)

Grant


September 17th, 2014 by
Posted in How To

Part 5 of 6 – Armature & Assembly

Life Cast Figures In ProgressIn this 5th installment of our Figure Guide we’ll be discussing figure armature and assembly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Grant


July 30th, 2014 by

Guide to Lifecast Figures - Sculpted Heads, Carved BodiesThis the fourth post of a 6 part series discussing the management of figures which will have sculpted bodies or heads.  The decision to sculpt a figure’s body or head is made for two very different reasons. (more…)

Grant


July 1st, 2014 by

Part 3 of 6: Life Casting

This the 3rd post of a 6 part series discussing the management and fabrication of human figures.  This month we’ll be discussing the process of life casting and its place in creating a figure.  We tend to be a little sloppy when we use the term life cast, often using it as a substitute for “figure.”  Some figures are completely assembled from life casts but most are a combination of sculpted and life cast pieces and some are totally sculpted with no life cast components at all.

Life Cast Figure - National Museum of the Marine CorpsThe term “life cast” refers to the process of making a mold of a body part from a live model.  Life casting is preferable to sculpting whenever a suitable model is available.  Life casting is an exact reproduction.  The level of detail and scientific accuracy life casting produces is impossible to completely achieve by sculpting.  The most common use of life casting is for hands and heads. If the figure being produced is of a young child, member of a historical ethnic group, or a historical person the head will most likely need to be sculpted instead of life cast. (more…)


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