Grant


July 1st, 2014 by

Part 3 of 6: Life Casting

This the 3rd post of a 6 part series discussing the management and fabrication of human figures.  This month we’ll be discussing the process of life casting and its place in creating a figure.  We tend to be a little sloppy when we use the term life cast, often using it as a substitute for “figure.”  Some figures are completely assembled from life casts but most are a combination of sculpted and life cast pieces and some are totally sculpted with no life cast components at all.

Life Cast Figure - National Museum of the Marine CorpsThe term “life cast” refers to the process of making a mold of a body part from a live model.  Life casting is preferable to sculpting whenever a suitable model is available.  Life casting is an exact reproduction.  The level of detail and scientific accuracy life casting produces is impossible to completely achieve by sculpting.  The most common use of life casting is for hands and heads. If the figure being produced is of a young child, member of a historical ethnic group, or a historical person the head will most likely need to be sculpted instead of life cast. (more…)

Kara


June 13th, 2014 by
Posted in Taylor News

Taylor Studios - Sketchbook 6Yes, Sketchbook 6, the latest addition in our sketchbook (brochure) series is here! Our sketchbooks have become somewhat of a collector’s item over the years. How many from the series have you collected? All five, maybe? Take a picture with your Sketchbook collection (has to be originals and not downloaded versions) and post it to our Facebook wall then I’ll send you Sketchbook 6 along with a coffee mug or t-shirt or something else equally cool! If you don’t have the back issues, you can download them or if you’d like a snazzy hardcopy of 4, 5, or 6, email me (kvanskike (at) taylorstudios (dot) com) your address and I’ll be happy to mail one to you (sorry all out of 1 and 2).

A Different Approach

Taylor Studios, Inc. has been on a fantastic Journey over the past 23 years and this Sketchbook shows some of our ‘greatest hits’ from the past four years (that’s how long its been since Sketchbook 5 was introduced!). While keeping with the Sketchbook theme, we changed things up a bit this time around. The most obvious change, aside from the sleeker dark color, is that it’s formatted in landscape rather than portrait. On the inside, you’ll find stories about TSI, many of our recent projects and a QR code which will explain some of the subtle references to…well, I’ll leave that for you to figure out.

Let me know what you think in the comments below and join the Journey online!

Grant


April 24th, 2014 by

This is the 2nd post of a 6 part series discussing the management and fabrication of human figures.  Last month we discussed decisions that need to be made during design and the effects those decisions have on durability, budget, references required, and the aesthetics of the final figure. This month we’ll be discussing what to expect and what decisions will need to be made during the initial phase of fabrication. (more…)

Betty


April 23rd, 2014 by

After more than 23 years of working in the interpretive design and fabrication arena, I repeatedly hear from clients they want their exhibits to be different and unique from all others.  Of course, every client has a different resource, history and story to tell, yet there are tried and true methods that can work for all visitor experiences.  Often components in exhibits can be similar and there are a few elements that can be unique.  Reasonably, this is how you will be able to effectively utilize limited budgets.  As an analogy, if you are renovating your kitchen, will you go to the expense to have everything custom made?  Maybe you want round cabinets instead of traditionally sized square ones?  Most people will buy base units and customize the finishes to meet their tastes.  You can apply this same creativity when thinking about your new exhibits. (more…)

Ryan


April 17th, 2014 by
Posted in Being Green
Cork and sustainable printing materials were used for this exhibit at Grand Bay NERR

Cork and other sustainable materials were used in exhibits at Grand Bay NERR

My last two posts have focused on the sustainability and environmental features of a building. After that big picture view, I am now going to focus on what clients nationwide come to Taylor Studios for; great exhibits. It’s a given that our exhibits will be interpretively based, innovatively designed, and well built. They can also be sustainable, but what does that mean for an exhibit? (more…)


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